The Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair – Saturday – September 8 2018

Posted: September 8, 2018 in Uncategorized

The Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair

is pleased to present a preview of the exhibition

Saturday, September 8th 5:00pm

Details on the website

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It’s Alive!
Frankenstein at 200

Opening at the Morgan Library and Museum October 12, 2018 through January 27, 2019. Commemorating the two hundredth anniversary of Frankenstein—a classic of world literature and a masterpiece of horror—a new exhibition at the Morgan, beginning October 12th, shows how Mary Shelley created a monster. It traces the origins and impact of her novel, which has been constantly reinterpreted in spinoffs, sequels, mashups, tributes and parodies.

It’s Alive!
Frankenstein at 200

Opening at the Morgan Library and Museum October 12, 2018 through January 27, 2019. Commemorating the two hundredth anniversary of Frankenstein—a classic of world literature and a masterpiece of horror—a new exhibition at the Morgan, beginning October 12th, shows how Mary Shelley created a monster. It traces the origins and impact of her novel, which has been constantly reinterpreted in spinoffs, sequels, mashups, tributes and parodies.

Barry Moser, No Father Had Watched My Infant Days, illustration in Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein, West Hatfield, Mass.: Pennyroyal Press, 1983. Morgan Library & Museum. The Morgan Library & Museum, PML 127245.6. Photography by Janny Chiu, 2017. © Pennyroyal Press.

Its organizing curator is John Bidwell, Astor Curator of Printed Books and Bindings at the Morgan Library & Museum, and the guest curator is Elizabeth Denlinger, Curator of the Carl H. Pforzheimer Collection of Shelley and His Circle at the New York Public Library. 

The curators will present a preview of the exhibition. Denlinger will speak about the novel as a work of literature with reference to its origins in Gothic art and literature and its treatment of scientific ethics, social issues, gender roles, religion, and morality. Bidwell
will trace its impact on popular culture from the stage versions of the 1820s to the classic horror movies of the 1930s, while also noting imitations, mashups, and parodies in paperbacks, comics, and graphic novels. They hope to shed light on the enduring fascination with Frankenstein in the theater, the cinema, the classroom, and other venues of the reading public.

Register for this talk

And here are a few of the related items which will be on display for sale by some of the BABF exhibitors this weekend.

Peter Harrington Rare Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First illustrated edition of Frankenstein

SHELLEY, Mary W. Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus. Revised, corrected, and illustrated with a new introduction, by the author; [bound with:] SCHILLER, Johannes. The Ghost Seer; [and:] BROWN, Charles Brockden. Edgar Huntly; or, The Sleep Walker.

London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley, 1831

3 works in 2 volumes, octavo (168 x 103 mm). Contemporary brown half morocco, spines lettered in gilt, marbled sides and endpapers, top edges gilt. Engraved frontispieces and illustrated title pages by Theodor von Holst. Mid-20th-century ownership inscription to front endpapers. Bound without series half-title or advertisements. Light rubbing to extremities, contents clean and bright, joints and hinges intact. An excellent copy.

First illustrated edition of Frankenstein, the third overall, and the final definitive text. The third edition was the first truly popular edition of the novel. In it Mary Shelley incorporated most of the changes introduced by William Godwin into the 1823 second edition, as well as numerous other revisions, including an entirely new chapter, and the famous “Introduction” in which she elaborates the tale of the novel’s genesis at the nocturnal storytelling session with Shelley, Byron and Polidori at the Villa Diodati. Mary lived for twenty more years, but the 1831 edition is her final text revision. The frontispiece is the first book illustration showing Frankenstein and the Creature.

The novel was issued in Bentley’s Standard Novels Series with one half of Friedrich Schiller’s “The Ghost Seer”, the second part of which was issued in another volume with Charles Brockden Brown’s “Edgar Huntly”. Normally the two volumes have been separated by time and Frankenstein enters the market with only one half of The Ghost Seer; this present copy has both volumes, and it is welcome to have Schiller’s story none-truncated.  Sadleir 3734a; Wolff 6280a.

 

Heartwoord Books and Art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rare First Edition

First Edition of Frankenstein in 1818 incontemporary binding.

Genre: Gothic novel, horror fiction, science fiction. There were only 500 printed.

While in Lake Geneva Lord Bryon challenged his guests Percy Shelly, Mary Shelly and Dr. John Polidori to a contest on whoever could write the best ghost story. The story Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus was written by Mary but published anonymously because the Publishing house didn’t believe a woman could write such a terrifying novel. Not until the second edition in 1823 did they list the author as Mary Shelley.

 

Pryor-Johnson Rare Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facsimile of the original manuscript

held in the Bodleian Library, Oxford.

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. SP Books – Editions des Saints Peres. (France 2018) Folio, 13”x9 1/2”, 1000 copies printed on Fedrigoni Avorio paper, bound in grey buckram, titled in silver, slipcased.

 

Captain Ahab’s Rare Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First UK photoplay edition [1931], and the first to depict Boris Karloff as the Frankenstein monster.

 

THIS WEEKEND!
100 Great Dealers
plus interesting talks and exhibits
Website

 

 

 

 

 

 

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